Monthly Archive:: December 2010

Following on from EVDB’s post yesterday “I am at the dentist right now, but it’s not one of my top five pet hates. Paying the dentist is though.” We’re collecting the rants to publish on Bowl Philosophy, so what are your top 5 pet hates? Highlights of upside down smile inducing moments include: Cyclists Not getting enough ginger with my sushi and having to ration it Ruining my stuff in the washing machine Waking up feeling remarkably fine after a big night and then realising after i get to the office that that was only because i was still drunk and it’s wearing off Cyclists Coins falling out of jean pockets and jeans falling off the clothes horse and no.1 is deft when the jeans fall off the clothes horse in the middle of the night AND all the coins fall out Surfers that take themselves very seriously in the water and models in general. Cyclists Salads that look really exciting but turn out to be just a mass of iceberg lettuce with a deceptive garnish Twats who describe everything as epic Traffic cops Yours? Hit the comments!

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Barbarians vs the Springboks, the last game of what has been an up and down (mostly down) season for the Bokke. The Barbarians have a proud rugby tradition and will be keen to beat the Bokke for the second time in a row, last winning in 2007. Not many people know this but not only were the orignal outfits worn by the Barbarians leather and furs but that they absolutely love a good ol fashioned sing along. Juan Smith is the captain in place of Victor Matfield who is finally being rested. Matfield is one player who can hold his head up high this year with stellar performances leading to an IRB Player of the Year nomination. I am not sold that he is the right man to lead the Bokke in the WC but his lineout play is second to none and his experience invaluable. Speaking of players of the year, well done to Richie McCaw for winning his 3rd IRB Player of the Year title. He has been phenomenal this year and is surely one of the greatest rugby players to have played the game. Let’s hope he gets injured in the Super 15… not really ( really). [&hellip

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Should WikiLeaks be published? Should this information be kept confidential? Does the public have a right to know or should diplomacy be conducted behind closed doors? For me, this quote from Max Frankel (New York Times, Washington bureau chief when the NYT published the Pentagon Papers in 1971) in Wednesday’s Guardian sums up the press’s responsibility to WikiLeaks: “It is up to government, not the press, to guard its secrets as long as it can, and to adjust to a new reality when it fails. It is the duty of the press to publish what it learns, and to find news where it can when it is denied” I’d amend that slightly to read: “It is the duty of the press to responsibly publish what it learns” There’s a difference between information being publicly available and journalists publicising this content, which should of course be done with editorial discretion. The problem is, in the hunt for recognition and acclaim some of South Africa’s publications will print whatever they can get their sensationalist paws on, further strengthening the ANC’s argument for legislating a muted press. Read the Daily Maverick’s article here

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Penned in longhand on hundreds of scraps of paper Tony Blair’s The Journey is a candid memoir and at times pretty quirky, except the tricky part about Iraq. Here’s an extract from the autobiography: ‘I had regularly started jogging out of Downing Street . On each run I happened to jog past a hooker standing on the same street corner, day after day. With some apprehension I would brace myself as I approached her for what was most certainly to follow. “Fifty quid!” she would shout from the kerb. “No way, 50p!” I fired back. This ritual between myself and the hooker continued for days. I’d run by and she’d yell, “Fifty quid!” And I’d yell back “50p!” One day however Cherie decided that she wanted to accompany me on my jog. As we jogged nearer the problematic street corner, I realised the “pro” would bark her £50 offer and Cherie would wonder what I’d really been doing on all my past outings. I realised I’d need to have a damn good explanation for my illustrious lawyer wife. As we jogged into the turn that would take us past the corner, I became even more apprehensive than usual. Sure enough, [&hellip

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